Whole Psalm. Mere early rising, without his blessing, would not secure what they hoped to accomplish, for everything is still in the hand of God. The steps or degrees in this Psalm, though distinctly marked, are not so regular as in some others. The Christian and the World (Part Eight). A.S.V. For so he giveth his beloved sleep - The word “for” is not in the original, The sentence is very obscure in the connection in which it stands. PSALM 127:2.

(Psa 127:2 NKJV) It is vain for you to rise up early, To sit up late, To eat the bread of sorrows; For so He gives His beloved sleep. Psalm 127:2 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓] Psalm 127:2, NIV: "In vain you rise early and stay up late, toiling for food to eat-- for he grants sleep to those he loves." They were hanging on for dear life to the sides of the boat and were ready to do whatever it took to save themselves.

See what over 145,000 subscribers are already receiving each day. It is vain for you to rise up early, to sit up late, to eat the bread of sorrows: for so he giveth his beloved sleep.

The psalmist also mentions sleep, which symbolizes and suggests the setting aside of care and forgetting one's need. To eat the bread of sorrows - Bread of care, anxiety, or trouble; that is, bread earned or procured by the severity of toil. Amplified® See what over 145,000 subscribers are already receiving each day. The Septuagint and Latin Vulgate render it, “Ye who eat the bread of care - rise when you have rested - when he hath given his beloved sleep.” Some have supposed it to mean that God gives his people rest without toil, or that, while others labor, his “beloved” - his friends - sleep; but this interpretation is not necessarily demanded by the Hebrew, and is inconsistent with the general doctrine of the Bible.

N.A.S.B. NASB E-Prime to eat the bread of sorrows; that is, to eat bread gotten with much sorrow and labour; such get bread, and that is all, and not that without the providence of God; for so he giveth his beloved sleep; that is, the Lord: such who are partakers of his grace, that fear and love him; to them, thus diligent and industrious, he gives not only bread to eat, but sleep, which to a labouring man is sweet; and having food and raiment, he gives them contentment, quietness, and satisfaction of mind, which is the greatest blessing of all.

John Darby’s Synopsis; The Geneva Study Bible; This lesson is applied here to four areas of life: 1) building a house, 2) guarding a city for security issues, 3) working long hours, and 4) rearing the children. The principle in this psalm, then, is that all human effort is vain unless we have the Lord's blessings. There may be an allusion here to the original sentence pronounced on man, Genesis 3:17. It is only by the favor of God, and by their recognizing their dependence on him, that they find repose, success, and freedom from care. Psalms 127:2 KJV. We can infer that the psalmist is someone who has been blessed by God.

Whole Psalm. That means that we have to take active steps to involve Him in every aspect of our lives. ... Psalm 127:1-5. Save us!”, John W. Ritenbaugh 3 Lo, children are an heritage of the LORD: and the fruit of the womb is his reward. KJV: King James Version . The meaning evidently is, that God bestows “sleep” upon his people in some sense in which it is not bestowed on others, or that there is, in regard to their case, something in which they differ from those who are so anxious and troubled - who rise so early for the sake of gain - who toil so late - who eat the bread of care. As a matter of fact, however, sitting up late has less tendency to promote success in life than early rising; but in either ease there is the same dependence on God. Cancel. As a consequence of this calmness of mind, and of their confidence in him, they enjoy undisturbed repose at night. Finding the new version too difficult to understand? Viewed as one of the "Degrees" in Christian virtue, the ninth, the Psalm is directed against self reliance. The principle in this psalm, then, is that all human effort is vain unless we have the Lord's blessings. Those who put their trust in God are delivered from fretting and fuming, and they are supplied rest. This daily newsletter provides a starting point for personal study, and gives valuable insight into the verses that make up the Word of God. As in the former case the psalmist does not express any opinion about the propriety or impropriety of early rising, so it is in respect to this. It is vain for you to rise up early - The psalmist does not here say that it is improper to rise early; or that there could be no advantage in it; or that people would be more likely to be successful in their undertakings if they did not rise early; but that, although this was done, they would be still altogether dependent on God. For, after all, it may come to nothing more at last than.

Psalm 127:2 King James Version << Psalm 126 | Psalm 127 | Psalm 128 >> 2 It is vain for you to rise up early, to sit up late, to eat the bread of sorrows: for so he giveth his beloved sleep. After all your toil the result is with him. Bible Language English. (Psa 127:1 NKJV) Unless the LORD builds the house, They labor in vain who build it; Unless the LORD guards the city, The watchman stays awake in vain. Health, strength, clearness of mind, and success, are all under his control; and though early rising may tend to produce all these - as it does in fact - yet still people are not the less dependent on God for success. They are not kept wakeful and anxious about their worldly affairs as other men are, for they leave all with God, and thus he “giveth his beloved sleep.” The particle “so” - כן kên - or “thus,” I apprehend, refers to the general sense of what had been said, rather than to what immediately precedes it; to the fact that all success depends on God Psalm 127:1, and that it is always by his interposition, and not as the result of human skill, toil, or fatigue, that people find calmness, success, repose. Psalms 127:2 (King James Version) A.F.V A.S.V. To get what Psalm 127:2 means based on its source text, scroll down or follow these links for the original scriptural meaning , biblical context and relative popularity. As for Nehemiah and his servants, they never put off their clothes day or night but for washing. The Bereans "received the word with all readiness, and searched the Scriptures daily to find out whether these things were so" (Acts 17:10-11). Compare all. We can relate to sleepless nights because we have all been in a state of anxiety about something. Some were probably bailing furiously. --H. T. Armfield.

We can infer that the psalmist is someone who has been blessed by God. They are not at all worried and overwrought. R.S.V. The Berean: Daily Verse and Comment Sign up for the Berean: Daily Verse and Comment, and have Biblical truth delivered to your inbox. 2 It is vain for you to rise up early, to sit up late, to eat the bread of sorrows: for so he giveth his beloved sleep.

God makes the mind of his people - his beloved - calm and tranquil, while the world around is filled with anxiety and restlessness - busy, bustling, worried. A.F.V To report dead links, typos, or html errors or suggestions about making these resources more useful use our convenient, Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology, The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary, International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Brenton Translaton of the Septuagint (LXX), Commentary Critical and Explanatory - Unabridged, Kretzmann's Popular Commentary of the Bible, Lange's Commentary on the Holy Scriptures. That means that we have to take active steps to involve Him in every aspect of our lives. He merely says that if it is done, this, of itself, will not accomplish the object; people are still dependent on God for success though they do it. To sit up late - That you may labor or study. Some suppose, with as little probability, that the meaning is, that what others hope (but hope in vain) to get by labor, the Lord bestows upon his people in sleep, they know not how. Some think respect is had to, Solomon, whose name was Jedidiah, and signifies the beloved of the Lord, 2 Samuel 12:24; to whom God gave peace, rest, and safety all around; or, as others, the kingdom without labour, when Absalom and Adonijah toiled for it: Christ, who is the Beloved of the Lord, the Son of his love, his well beloved Son, may be thought of, whose rest is glorious; his sleep in the grave, where his flesh rested from his labours and sufferings, in hope of the resurrection of it: and it may be applied to all the Lord's beloved ones; to whom he gives spiritual rest in this world, sleep in the arms of Jesus at death, and an everlasting rest in the world to come; all which depends not on their endeavours, but on his grace and goodness.

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